For crushing
strength batch 1 was found to have a mean strength of 37.5± 4.7668N and batch 2
36.2± 4.5277N. The reduction in strength is due to decreased compression force and
less condensed particles, requiring less force to overcome the intermolecular forces.
If the tablet is too hard it may not disintegrate in the requisite time, and if
it too soft, it may not withstand patient handling or packaging. However,
generally dispersible tablets have less physical resistance than regular
tablets. It may be possible that moisture uptake may have affected excipients
such as the binder allowing it to be crushed more easily. A study conducted on
dispersible lamotrigine tablets repackaged into compliance aids also
demonstrated a reduction in hardness and 60 days into the study, a 21.9%
reduction had been reported. Variations in hardness is common with friability
and such changes are likely to alter the dissolution profile and
bioavailability of aspirin, affecting its efficacy and performance12.
 Friability should be measured if the
study was to be repeated, to determine tablets ease of chipping and breaking.

The time
taken for the tablet to disintegrate decreased from 20 to 12 seconds. Rapid
disintegration and in turn rapid dissolution can potentially affect performance
and bioavailability of a drug, hence impacting its shelf life. Common
disintegrants which are chemically stable in original packaging can be hugely affected by moisture. A study conducted on asprin,
atenolol and lansoprazole showed a decline in stability profiles when
repackaged into MCA’s for 8 weeks, particularly their disintegration times. A
faster time was observed for aspirin and atenolol, however both complied with
BP standards10.  It has been demonstrated that moisture uptake
associated with disintegrants can result in micro-cracks due to the disintegrant
swelling, causing it to disintegrate quicker, affecting the medications
performance15.  According to BP, dispersible
tablets disintegrate within 15 minutes, using water at 37° C7. Thus,
the tablets complied with the requirements.

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In future dissolution
can be tested to measure the rate of drug release, providing an indication of
the bio-availability of aspirin. A study on Sodium valproate 100mg tablets
after repackaging and storage under various conditions showed variable
dissolution compared to controls, with the most pronounced differences being
demonstrated at 40°C/75% RH16. Many dissolution profiles indicated
slower, and in certain cases incomplete, absorption of the drug, therefore
affecting the bioavailability.

The study was
limited as environmental factors such as temperature and humidity weren’t accounted
for, nor controlled. Tablets should be tested at differing temperatures and various
humidity. These factors were not monitored and therefore we cannot account for
any fluctuations that may have occurred. This may be measured using a
hygrometer or a digital thermometer in the future. Factors such as patient or
pharmacist handling weren’t considered, therefore the results aren’t a reliable
representation as different situations a patient may experience weren’t simulated,
such as storage in a humid bathroom.  Also, measurements were taken at week 5 and not
varying time intervals, for example t = 3 weeks. The study period for which the
tablets were stored was too short to observe major changes and greater degradation
may have been apparent after 5 weeks. The safety of the use in polypharmacy was
not tested as we didn’t combine other medications. A study stored dispersible
aspirin tablets alongside 5 other medications for 5 weeks17. Although, no degradation was detected in these quantitative HPLC
methods, this parameter should be tested in the future.For crushing
strength batch 1 was found to have a mean strength of 37.5± 4.7668N and batch 2
36.2± 4.5277N. The reduction in strength is due to decreased compression force and
less condensed particles, requiring less force to overcome the intermolecular forces.
If the tablet is too hard it may not disintegrate in the requisite time, and if
it too soft, it may not withstand patient handling or packaging. However,
generally dispersible tablets have less physical resistance than regular
tablets. It may be possible that moisture uptake may have affected excipients
such as the binder allowing it to be crushed more easily. A study conducted on
dispersible lamotrigine tablets repackaged into compliance aids also
demonstrated a reduction in hardness and 60 days into the study, a 21.9%
reduction had been reported. Variations in hardness is common with friability
and such changes are likely to alter the dissolution profile and
bioavailability of aspirin, affecting its efficacy and performance12.
 Friability should be measured if the
study was to be repeated, to determine tablets ease of chipping and breaking.

The time
taken for the tablet to disintegrate decreased from 20 to 12 seconds. Rapid
disintegration and in turn rapid dissolution can potentially affect performance
and bioavailability of a drug, hence impacting its shelf life. Common
disintegrants which are chemically stable in original packaging can be hugely affected by moisture. A study conducted on asprin,
atenolol and lansoprazole showed a decline in stability profiles when
repackaged into MCA’s for 8 weeks, particularly their disintegration times. A
faster time was observed for aspirin and atenolol, however both complied with
BP standards10.  It has been demonstrated that moisture uptake
associated with disintegrants can result in micro-cracks due to the disintegrant
swelling, causing it to disintegrate quicker, affecting the medications
performance15.  According to BP, dispersible
tablets disintegrate within 15 minutes, using water at 37° C7. Thus,
the tablets complied with the requirements.

In future dissolution
can be tested to measure the rate of drug release, providing an indication of
the bio-availability of aspirin. A study on Sodium valproate 100mg tablets
after repackaging and storage under various conditions showed variable
dissolution compared to controls, with the most pronounced differences being
demonstrated at 40°C/75% RH16. Many dissolution profiles indicated
slower, and in certain cases incomplete, absorption of the drug, therefore
affecting the bioavailability.

The study was
limited as environmental factors such as temperature and humidity weren’t accounted
for, nor controlled. Tablets should be tested at differing temperatures and various
humidity. These factors were not monitored and therefore we cannot account for
any fluctuations that may have occurred. This may be measured using a
hygrometer or a digital thermometer in the future. Factors such as patient or
pharmacist handling weren’t considered, therefore the results aren’t a reliable
representation as different situations a patient may experience weren’t simulated,
such as storage in a humid bathroom.  Also, measurements were taken at week 5 and not
varying time intervals, for example t = 3 weeks. The study period for which the
tablets were stored was too short to observe major changes and greater degradation
may have been apparent after 5 weeks. The safety of the use in polypharmacy was
not tested as we didn’t combine other medications. A study stored dispersible
aspirin tablets alongside 5 other medications for 5 weeks17. Although, no degradation was detected in these quantitative HPLC
methods, this parameter should be tested in the future.

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