In Korea’s economy is one of the poorest

In Modern society, media is presented in many different ways. Through the internet, television, books, newspapers, and magazine, media is unavoidable. Freedom of press and media Is not a privilege in other countries as it does for the United States, Countries like North Korea are examples of a completely different press freedom. Following World War 2, Korea was split into a Southern (Western-oriented) and a Northern (Communist). North Korea is located in eastern Asian in the northern half of the Korean peninsula boarding the Sea of Japan. North Korea is surrounded by mountainous terrain and has made most of their profit from agricultural work. North Korea is internationally deemed as a dangerous country, very unpopular as a tourist destination.  North Korea’s economy is one of the poorest in the world. Millions of North Korea citizens are malnourished and living in hazardous conditions. The main issue with North Korea is how the majority of the population is starving while the military still has millions to produce weapons of mass destruction. Due to the dedication of the army and weapons, the U.S. believes the weapons in North Korea’s possession are going to be used to fund terrorism.  President George Bush stated during a press conference that North Korea was one of the countries in the “axis of evil” along with Iran and Iraq. The press has no freedom in North Korea. The leader Kim Jong II uses the press as a propaganda tool under his totalitarian rule. A Citizen who dared criticize the government in any form of way would be subjected to prison. The Government owns all radio and television stations. The people of North Korea do not have the right to the internet, although they don’t even know much of its existence. Apart from Citizens having no freedom, a foreign journalist is subject to the same strict laws and policies. Every report is monitored and restricted by Kim Jong II (“North Korea,” 2001).     North Korean News-Press isn’t the same as in democratic countries, they have no citizen run a press. The only three newspapers in the country are run by the political organization’s (“North Korea,” 2001, p.1). Unlike Western Newspapers, these papers have no articles related to crimes, advertisement, accidents, and daily life. North Korea television is strictly used for media propaganda. The leader Jong 11 uses television to share his policies and his party lines. The policies are repeated every hour of the day. (Korea News: Press Media, 2001, p.2) ?    The same agenda of propaganda is used in the several Korean radio broadcasting stations. The citizens are allowed to listen to radio and television but only if they purchase tweaked radios from the government that only broadcast their channels. Since most people cannot afford to buy radios, the government installs loudspeakers in each household that are connected to the city office, broadcasting only selected news. (Korea News: Press Media, 2001).