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Reasoning for the Answers

Question 1

The commentary writer talks about the creativity of the author of the extract in expressing her views and feelings about the duo band. The creativity is shown in the extract from a few lines such as when she says, “Listening to White Blood Cells feels like being hypnotized into joining a sinister religious cult for the 15-track duration.” This is quite novel, and shows her ability to think of something that nobody has done before, comparing the album to listening to a religious cult. In the next line, she goes further to say, “Remarkably, it manages to be insanely, impertinently derivative without irritating the listener.” This further illustrates her creativity.

Question 2

The commentary writer goes ahead to talk about the use of diction, description, imagery, colloquialism, sarcasm, contrast, and rhetoric questions. The use of diction is illustrated by the choice of words, such as “with her drums, bashing away intensely, all long, drippy pigtails and hillbilly stillness, like she might feel more at home spanking the banjo in an all-female remake of Deliverance.” This shows the diction or choice of words used throughout the extract. Description is common in the extract, such as when she says, “Dressed only in red, white, a touch of black, Jack and Meg Wade resemble something Andy Warhol and David Byrne might have dreamt up for an art happening,” or better still, “… you think you’re hearing some misogynistic upstart sneering at his girlfriend…” Imagery has also been used through the visual descriptions such as, “It’s as if all the best facets of twentieth-century music have been fed into one of those car-crushing machines, and White Stripes are the cube that pops out at the end.” The use of fed creates the imagery. Colloquial language is used, which is illustrated by words such as ‘movies,’ ‘gonna,’ ‘we’re’ and amongst others. Sarcasm is displayed by lines such as, “There’s Jack on vocals and guitar, twanging away hypnotically, all raven, mussed hair and screaming paleness. He resembles one of the lost small town teenagers who sat beside the dead body in River’s Edge.” This line also shows contrast and comparison. One of the rhetoric questions is, “which makes you wonder what sort of children they might have had.” This does not require an answer. Rather, it is meant for effect since nobody would be able to know.

Question 3

The commentary writer went ahead to suggest that the extract writer used vivid description of the eccentric duo band. This can be identified in the line saying, “Dressed only in red, white, a touch of black, Jack and Meg Wade resemble something Andy Warhol and David Byrne might have dreamt up for an art happening.” The use of color makes the description vivid, since it creates a picture in the mind of the reader. Vivid shows brightness, and use of a color such as red shows vividness. Thus, the author manages to describe their attire vividly.

Question 4

The commentary author further describes sarcastic comparison and imagery. Some of the lines that show sarcastic comparison are the lines comparing Jack to a teenage boy besides a corpse and the next about Meg. These lines are, “He resembles one of the lost smalltown teenagers who sat beside the dead body in River’s Edge,” and … like she might feel more at home spanking the banjo in an all-female remake of Deliverance. Another sarcastic comparison when she says, “… anyway we’re-Just-Like-You-Guys bonhomie (the last refuge of the talentless pop scoundrel).” Comparing oneself to another negative attribute of another person is outright sarcasm, intended to show the lack of talent in the person being addressed.

Question 5

The commentary author comments about the colloquial language used by the extract author. It is evident there are many colloquial words within the extract, which make the extract informal to create a connection with the reader. Some of the colloquial words found in the text include, gonna, to mean going to, twentysomethings, hillbilly and thieving to mean stilling. There are other words that are used by different authors normally, which qualify as colloquialism. Some of them include, ‘wanna,’ ‘oughta,’ ‘lotta,’ ‘gotcha,’ and ‘gimme,’ amongst others. However, such language will depend on the author, since it is a matter of using words in a different way or using different a word to mean a phrase such as ‘gimme,’ which means ‘give me.’

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